Alexandria Digital Research Library

Between Black and Brown: Blaxican Identity and Experience in the United States

Author:
Romo, Rebecca
Degree Grantor:
University of California, Santa Barbara. Sociology
Degree Supervisor:
G. Reginald Daniel and Denise A. Segura
Place of Publication:
[Santa Barbara, Calif.]
Publisher:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Creation Date:
2011
Issued Date:
2011
Topics:
Hispanic American Studies, Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, and Black Studies
Keywords:
Multiracial
Blaxican
Monoracial
Dual-Minority
Genres:
Dissertations, Academic and Online resources
Dissertation:
Ph.D.--University of California, Santa Barbara, 2011
Description:

This study explores the identity formation and experiences of 40 Blaxican, or Black-Mexican multiracial individuals in the United States. In-depth interviews and focus groups reveal that participants identify biracially as "Blaxican." Participants reject monoraciality and the common sense way of defining Blackness as defined by the one-drop rule of hypodescent. Participants are either bicultural or monocultural dependent whether they were raised in single parent vis-a-vis co-parenting households. The authentic expression of Blaxicanness is to identify as biracial and have a bicultural identity, therefore those that are monocultural work to incorporate both cultures into their identities. Parental socialization, peer groups, school and neighborhood contexts are the main socializing agents that shape Blaxican identities. I find that Blaxicans live in a borderlands space in between the social constructions of Black and Chicana/o identities. Black and Chicana/o peers police the boundaries around "authentic" half-Black and half-Mexican identity forcing Blaxicans to the borderlands where ambiguity, and contradictions are embraced. Blaxicans experience monoracial microaggressions (Nadal et al. 2011) that signal their non-normative, marginal and second-class citizen status.

Physical Description:
1 online resource (296 pages)
Format:
Text
Collection(s):
UCSB electronic theses and dissertations
ARK:
ark:/48907/f33f4mhw
ISBN:
9781267194374
Catalog System Number:
990037519140203776
Rights:
Inc.icon only.dark In Copyright
Copyright Holder:
Rebecca Romo
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