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    Also known as the Pearl Chase Collection, focusing on Santa Barbara history in the 20th century. Included are papers relating to several hundred local organizations (especially pertaining to architecture, gardens, housing, land use, and planning), as well events such as Fiesta, Chase family papers, and numerous photographs of local scenes.
    Photographs of famed film composer Bernard Herrmann including publicity photos, personal photos and studio photos of scoring sessions.
    Black and white photographs, most taken by Arthur London of scenes in and around Kumasi from 1909-1920. There also are photographs of the voyages to and from Africa, as well as Arthur, his wife Edith, son Arthur James Godfrey, daughter Joy, his mother, and what appear to be other family and friends in England. The last photographs, from the early 1920s, are from Australia and probably were taken by Edith or other family members.
    The University Archives photographs collection is comprised of photographs culled from other collections in the University Archives. The dates of the photographs range from the 1890s to the present, with the majority being black and white photos from the 1920s and 1950s. The subjects covered include all aspects of the UCSB campuses and academic and student life.
    Over 2000 35mm color mounted slides, taken by Ronald McPeak of the underwater biota of giant kelp forests in California and Baja Mexico from 1965 to 1999. There also are images of kelp harvesting in California, salmon spawning in Alaskan streams, and aerial and landscape views of coastal California and its offshore islands.
    Black and white photographs relating to the Flying A Studios (aka American Film Manufacturing Company), a film company that operated in Santa Barbara (1912-1920).
    A few photographic portraits of famed psychologist Carl Ransom Rogers. Carl Ransom Rogers (1902-1987) was a psychologist and psychotherapist who initiated what Abraham Maslow later called the "third force" of psychology, following the behaviorism of Pavlov (and later B. F. Skinner) and Freudian psychoanalysis. This "third force" of humanistic psychology has been so closely identified with Rogers that it is often called Rogerian, a term its namesake objected to. His innovation was to treat clients as if they were essentially healthy, and he felt that growth would occur when a non-judgmental, non-directive (later, "client-centered") therapist created a warm, accepting environment to nurture the client and allow self-knowledge and self-acceptance to occur. Rogers is considered by many to be the most influential psychologist after Freud.
    Color and black and white photographs taken by John S. Kiewit from about 1968 to 2000. The images reflect what Kiewit saw on his travels throughout California and the West, as well as trips to other parts of the U.S. and the world. Prominent places and themes include Baja, barns and farms, Big Sur, buildings and building elements (doors and windows), Carmel [CA], Central Coast [CA], Channel Islands, Death Valley, fences, ghost towns, Hawaii, Hollister Ranch [CA], landscapes, Malibu [CA], Marin County [CA], New England, New Mexico, ocean views, Oregon, Oxnard [CA], rock formations, signs, surfing, trees, Utah, wildflowers, Wyoming, and Yosemite. Other countries represented in the collection include Cook Island, Costa Rica, El Salvador, England, France, Guatemala, Marques and Tahiti Islands, Mexico, Micronesia, and New Zealand. Most of the images were taken from the 1970s to the 1990s.